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Ancient 3,000-year-old Castle Found Under Turkish Lake

While searching for frightening Lake Van's monster, scientists are making great archaeological underwater discoveries.

Experts have been studying Lake Van for more than a decade before divers discover a well-preserved ancient fortress.

The discovery was made by archaeologists from Van Yüzüncü Yıl who discovered the castle along with the divers' team and the underwater photographer and videographer.

It is estimated that the mysterious ruins were built by the Urartu civilization, an Iron Age kingdom that lived in the region between the 6th and 9th century BC.

Local legend has long been saying about a city lost by the water, which has changed drastically over the last few thousand years.

Trips and Explore This Natural Wonders, Before They Gone Forever

Image: Sedef Piker Twitter: @SedefsCorner

An underwater videographer and dive team head Tahsin Ceylan told Turkishou Andalou Agency that according to other divers and archaeologists familiar with the lake advised the team that they could not find much in the water, they continued research and found the fort ancient.

But they eventually discovered that the incredible ruins were part of a vast site that stretched for about a kilometer.

Despite being underwater for centuries, the height of the visible portion of the remaining castle walls ranges between 10 and 13 feet in height.

This is not the first discovery team made on the lake. Last year they found an area of 1.5 square miles with a strange stalagmite size, dubbed the "underwater fairy chimney".

They have found mullets of pearls, microbes, corals and even Russian ships that were thought to have sunk in 1948; But the team has now found the jackpot with the invention of their "miracle".

Tahsin Ceylan told Hurriyet Daily News that many civilizations and people have settled around Lake Van, they named the lake the "upper ocean" and believed that it hid many mysterious things.

For that belief, they work to reveal the secrets of the lake. The rocks used to build an underwater castle, along with a number of villages and settlements in the area, Lake Van has a history of about 600,000 years.

Historians will be able to use this discovery to learn more about the kingdom, which has considerable political force in the 8th and 9th centuries BC.



Urartu, also known as the Van Kingdom, is an ancient nation that stretches in parts of modern Turkey, Armenia, and Iran. Lake Van is considered to have become an important focus for civilization.

The study was conducted at the bottom of the urban Urartian's historic sea in our town, showing an age of nearly 3,000 years, "said Adilcevaz District Governor Arif Karaman.

However, some are now wondering whether the findings could also withstand an answer to the lost city of Atlantis, which is considered a fictional island.

The first mention of Atlantis is known to exist in the writings of ancient Greek philosophers Plato in 360 BCE.

The mythical underwater island is said to have been created by half-human and half-gods, allegedly destroyed overnight due to the earthquake and tsunami.

The lost empire of Urartu is enveloped in mystery because very little is known about this ancient place and its people's origins.

The Hebrews call it the Ararat and in modern times was crowned as the Kingdom of Van.


The beginning of the kingdom was lost in the prehistoric fog, but before it was destroyed, Urartu was located in eastern Turkey, Iran, and the modern Republic of Armenia.

The mention of early documented documents on Urartu land can be found in Assyrian sources.

Urartu Castle underwater is about 1 kilometer (0.9 miles) in diameter, with walls reaching 3 to 4 meters (10-13 feet) high.

It is still in good condition thanks to the alkaline conditions. of the lake has kept it in good enough condition.

The history of Van Lake is back around 6,000 years.

Lake Van is the largest lake in Turkey and the second largest in the Middle East. It is also the largest sodium water lake in the world.

The lake is located on the plateau of the eastern Anatolia region near the border with Iran.

It was formed by a crater caused by the volcanic eruption of Mount Nemrut near the province of Van.

Lost Kingdom Of Urartu


Image: ancientpages.com

The lost empire of Urartu is enveloped in mystery because very little is known about this ancient place and its people's origins.

This time our journey takes us to ancient Armenia where we seek the mysterious traces of the empire of Urartu as the Assyrians call it.

The Hebrews call it the Ararat and in modern times was crowned as the Kingdom of Van.

The beginning of the kingdom was lost in the prehistoric fog, but before it was destroyed, Urartu was located in eastern Turkey, Iran, and the modern Republic of Armenia.

The mention of early documented documents on Urartu land can be found in Assyrian sources.

Based on what we know, Urartu people are famous metal workers, speak languages related to Hurrian (languages ​with no other known connections), and they adopt a pointy text of Assyria for their own purposes.

Though it can not be said with certainty, apparently from the ninth century, Urartu was ruled by a single dynasty, extending the three kingdoms to the south in a period in which Assyria was weak.

The real origin of the Urartu people is unknown. Some historians think these people migrated from somewhere west to the Armenian highlands, most known as Nairi.

They call themselves Khaldun or the children of the god Khaldis, just as the Assyriese name reflects the name of their god Assur.

"The oldest countries of the Soviet Union were founded 3,000 years ago south of Transcaucasia.

The oldest of them, that in the area of ​​Ararat, near Lake Van, is called Urartu.

Kings rule Georgian tribes, "Professor Shestokov, a Caucasian author, wrote in 1939.


Image: ancientpages.com

In 1827, German scholar Friedrich Eduard Schulz conducted the first known experiment to study the ancient ruins.

Schulz made copies of a number of inscriptions and sent them back to Paris.

Unfortunately, Schulz and his party were attacked by bandits in 1829 and he was killed.

In 1827, German scholar Friedrich Eduard Schulz conducted the first known experiment to study the ancient ruins.

Schulz made copies of a number of inscriptions and sent them back to Paris. Unfortunately, Schulz and his party were attacked by bandits in 1829 and he was killed.

These copies were not published until 1840 in Paris, where there were several inscriptions in Ancient Persian and Assyrian, excluding translations, while other inscriptions in unknown languages. In 1847 and 1850 new copies were taken from the inscription.

Several attempts have been made to decipher Armenian texts through Armenian now.

The failure of this effort led some to believe that the inscription must be in several unknown foreign languages, both Indo-European and Semitic.